10 North American Cities with European style

Modern North America as we know it today was initially founded by Europeans. They resettled in the Americas from Canada to the bottom of Chile and eventually, each country started developing its own identity, but their European background is still clearly visible in some cities throughout North America.

Some people like to travel to European cities for various reasons such as walking down the Champs-Élysées avenue in Paris, or looking at the gorgeous architecture that Rome has to offer, but long flight hours, dealing with airport customs, and sometimes travel bans (such as travel ban for Americans to travel to Europe during the COVID pandemic) or language barriers would make it hard to travel to Europe. However, there’s an alternative solution to these challenges, traveling within North American cities with European architecture and history!

In this post, we’ll introduce you to the top 10 North American cities with European style.

1- Quebec City, Quebec, Canada

Founded in the 17th century by French explorer Samuel de Champlain, Quebec City is the capital of Quebec province in Canada. This city reminds you of Marseilles in France instead of Canada! There are countless European style attractions in Quebec City such as The Citadelle of Quebec, a colonial-era fort along the river which guards the approach into the city, or narrow cobblestone streets meander past classic storefronts. The options are limitless in this beautiful city!

2- Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Found in 1630, Boston is one of America’s oldest cities. This city is a mixture of cobblestone streets, monuments everywhere, and diehard sports fans. some of America’s most important events have had happened in Boston such as the Boston Tea party when angry colonists protested ‘taxation without representation. Today, walking in the streets of Boston gives one the feeling of getting lost in a European city with a diverse culture and different good smells coming out of the shops!

3- Puebla, Mexico

Puebla is only 75 miles (120 km) away from the capital, Mexico City. This city is famous for its Spanish colonial buildings such as Capilla del Rosario (Rosary Chapel) and the Puebla Cathedral, which designs were sent directly from Spain. Puebla also has a UNESCO World Heritage Site (Puebla’s historic center).

4- Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Similar to Quebec City, Montreal is French-influenced, both in architecture and culture. This city attracts international artists from all over the world to itself because of its artistic vibe and opportunities. When in Montreal, you’d definitely feel like being in a French city where modernity and history are well blended with each other.

5- Holland, Michigan, USA

Since most of early Michigan’s residents were from Holland, there’s a big Dutch influence in this state, from people’s family names to beautiful European-style cities such as the famous tulip festival in Holland. The best time to visit this beautiful small town is in May when tulips are everywhere. In fact, Holland’s tulip festival is among one of the best small-town festivals in the United States.

6- Belfast, Maine, USA

Belfast, Maine

Belfast, named after Northern Ireland’s capital, truly lives its name. This small town was burnt during the war in 1812 but had been rebuilt and became one of the largest shipbuilding centers in the United States. As a result, the company owners began building European style mansions for themselves which has formed the new look to the Belfast.

7- New Orleans, Louisiana, USA

New Orleans is pretty unique compared to other North American cities. This city was influenced by French and Spanish settlers which is obvious throughout the city if you walk down the streets of New Orleans. However, the Spanish buildings are more than the French ones since they came to the city later and destroyed most of the French influence in the city.

8- Morelia, Mexico

Having multiple names until it finally been named Morelia (after a local revolutionary leader in the Mexican independence war). Morelia is heavily Spanish influenced that after roaming around for a few minutes, you’ll forget you’re still in Mexico.

9- Santa Barbara, California, USA

Santa Barbara is one of those fortunate cities that have been located at the best spot for its perfect weather, lovely beaches, dreamy wineries, and fine eateries which would constantly remind you of somewhere in Southern France! There’s a good reason for those who travel to this city and never come back!

10- Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

Victoria, the capital of beautiful British Columbia, was built by the Britons. The city hall, governmental buildings, and the hotels would constantly trick your mind that you’re somewhere in England! Enjoy the Butchart gardens after watching whales on the way and walk on the peaceful streets to have one of the most unforgettable trips of your life!s

Posted by

Life is a bubble, Make your bubble as delusional as possible!

11 thoughts on “10 North American Cities with European style

  1. Even these European style architectures in the US have an American influence to them. I think after living in Europe, I can tell from looking at a photo of the architecture if it’s in Europe or the Americas. I have become quite fond of the Spanish style architecture in California too. My college had some of that and it was always nice to walk past it every day!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I lived 12 years in R.I. and even though NYC will always have my ❤ I absolutely adore Boston! A few years ago we visited NOLA and I fell in love with that city as well. Unique architecture and the people are awesome. I’ve told you many times how much i want to see your 🇨🇦 so I appreciate the information. Great post 😊

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s