The Safest Places in Latin America for Travelers

Latin America is not known as the safest place for visitors but that’s mostly a stereotype! If you visit the right places, be respectful, and don’t show off your fancy stuff in the street, Latin American countries will be your “Go-To” places to visit. In this post, we’ll talk about the 10 safest places in Latin America for travelers.

The funny part is that all of the places below are ranked better than the U.S., Greece, and China in the Global Peace Index.

Galapagos Islands, Ecuador

The Galapagos Islands are heaven for nature lovers thanks to their wildlife’s diversity. The Galapagos Islands are more than 1000 km off of Ecuador’s mainland and are too isolated and unpopulated to be a crime scene! Plus, in general, Ecuador is one of the safest countries to visit in Latin America.

Costa Rica

Costa Rica is constantly rated as the safest country in Central America and the Caribbeans which means you can enjoy relaxing on those white sand beaches while enjoying the tropical weather and hike the trails to volcanoes, or swim in pools covered by waterfalls.

Panama

Panama is increasingly becoming a hot spot in Central America for those who either like to relax or adventure. being among the 50 safest countries in the world, Panama is calling you!

The Amazon

I know! Amazon is not an actual country. It is within the borders of Brazil, Colombia, Peru, Ecuador, and a handful of other countries. The isolation of Amazon has made it a very safe place to discover for nature lovers before it disappears!

Chile

Being the narrowest country in the world, Chile is a wonderland of amazing cities like Santiago, Puente Alto, and Antofagasta. Visitors can also enjoy Chile’s rich history by visiting places like Rapa Nui island. Chile is fairly safe with pickpocketing being the worst crime against travelers which would happen in any major city around the world. Just be respectful and a little cautious and you’ll be fine!

Uruguay

Uruguay, a small Latin American country, is sandwiched between Argentina and Brazil. The advantage of traveling to Uruguay is that you’ll be greeted by a mixed culture of Spanish and Portuguese without crowds of tourists (at least until now), spectacular wine, and warm people. Uruguay is one of the safest countries in Latin America, so sit back and enjoy the view with a glass of wine in your hand.

Paraguay

Similar to Uruguay in name, Paraguay is also off of tourists’ radar. Paraguay is landlocked between Argentina, Brazil, and Bolivia. It is home to a landscape of subtropical forests and sprawling savannas. Complete with rivers, waterfalls, natural lakes, and a handful of historic landmarks, it’s one country that might not be on your travel checklist – but it should be.

Paraguay is ranked 88 in the Global Peace Index while the United States is ranked 128.

Argentina

Even though Argentina is the world’s 8th largest country and the second-largest country in Latin America after Brazil, this country is among the safest countries to visit in Latin America. Argentina is truly diverse in nature, featuring snow on one side and year-round warm beaches on the other side. Don’t forget to visit the Iguazu Waterfalls if you are a waterfall chaser.

Peru

Whether you’re interested in Inca culture or simply a fantastic view, Peru is the place to go. home to Machu Picchu – the fortified Inca town hidden at the very top of the Andes, Peru is extremely safe for travelers and has been attracting curious people to itself for decades.

Nicaragua

Nicaragua is the third-safest country in Central America. Similar to other Central American countries, Nicaragua is filled with breathtaking landscapes, from volcanic rock to superb beaches. But the bonus point goes to those who like Colonial architecture as Nicaragua’s buildings are entirely built with Colonial-style!

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16 thoughts on “The Safest Places in Latin America for Travelers

  1. So beautiful. Why did I think the Galapagos Islands were in the middle of the ocean, tens of thousands of miles from anywhere? Perhaps I should travel more!

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  2. I love things that burst stereotypes! I remember my parents and I considered moving to Costa Rica and my boss flipped out when we told him! And his reaction was based on stereotypes. If the term Karen had been popular then, I would have said, “Okay, Karen”. After all, Karens are obnoxious about stereotyping

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  3. It cannot be said that there is no security problem in Latin America, you only have to look at the number of police and private guards or the systems of protection against intrusion to realise this. However, it is difficult to establish a general rule per country, as the situation varies greatly from place to place within the same country. Wherever I went in Latin America, the general population was the first protection against crime, they themselves are the victims and they are ashamed that this may be the image of their country. Unfortunately, robberies and assaults happen, more often in the cities and where there are tourists. Prudence and common sense are essential, provided that the risks are no greater than in large western cities.

    Liked by 2 people

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